Hurricane Project

Rubric: PDF WORD (version 2.70)

Part I: Introduce Your Hurricane and make a clear, convincing and articulate argument (your CLAIM) as to why you think that particular hurricane is noteworthy. Like any other argument you'll make in this class, you MUST support that argument with evidence and reasoning.

Part II: Give me basic data about the storm.

  • When did it form
  • Where did it form
  • Where was it strongest
  • What were the storm's max winds

NOTE: Be careful how you present this data. If you are giving an oral presentation, bullet points on a Power Point (or some other) presentation are fine as long as you discuss them.

Bullet points in a written presentation, report or similar sort of document is problematic at best. Remember, you are backing up your claim as to why your particular hurricane is so noteworthy.

Part III: Vector & Scalar Math

  • Use the Accuweather Interactive Hurricane Tracker to view your storm (notice that you can scroll the map back and forth, up and down as well as zoom in.

  • Pick a certain period of the storm

  • Pick two points during that period separated by at least 5 data points

  • Plot at least 5 (more can be helpful) points between those points on your map

    1. Calculate the distance the storm moved during those two points (SHOW ALL YOUR WORK/CALUCLATIONS). You may find that the lat/long distance calculator to be helpful

    2. Calculate the x component of the storm's motion (SHOW ALL YOUR WORK/CALUCLATIONS). You may find that the lat/long distance calculator to be helpful

    3. Calculate the y component of the storm's motion (SHOW ALL YOUR WORK/CALUCLATIONS). You may find that the lat/long distance calculator to be helpful

    4. Calculate the displacement including magnitude and direction between those two points (SHOW ALL YOUR WORK/CALUCLATIONS)

Part IV: Presenting Your Claim and backing it up with evidence and reasoning:

HINT: Be sure to *reference* your sources. That does not mean to cite your sources it means to reference them generally in the body of your work. Please see me if you don't know the difference between those.

Here are some options-- you are NOT limited to those but you will need to do a proposal to me first before I ok your project:

    1. A Lesson Plan: as if you were going to teach that topic to your own students. You'll design your plan much the same as I do with my own daily lesson plans: Opening Question, Learning Target, Words of the Day and of course the Work of the Day including tasks and activities for your students to do
    2. A Presentation to the Class of not less than 5 minutes
      • Each slide can have no more than 5 words total
      • Be VERY well rehearsed with excellent voice and eye contact
      • Be very engaging to your audience yet retaining a strong science component

3. Children's Book/Presentation -- Absolutely!

4. An Informational Pamphlet -- YES!

5. A Essay Paper

 

    Rubric is HERE